CFS With Persistent Active Infections.
CFS is Not Post-Infectious

 

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What is this page about?

This page will show that CFS is associated with multiple, ongoing viral and bacterial infections.
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ME / CEBVSPVFSCFIDSCFSSEID?

This disease has gone by many names.

  • ME - myalgic encephalomyelitis
  • CEBVS - chronic Epstein-Barr virus syndrome
  • PVFS - post-viral fatigue syndrome
  • CFIDS - chronic fatigue immune dysfunction syndrome
  • CFS - chronic fatigue syndrome
  • SEID - systemic exertion intolerance disease

 

They keep using more and more vague wording to deny the root cause of this disease, immunosuppression with multiple, ongoing viral and bacterial infections.
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Index

 

Entry: Studies ID Tags
  Persisting illness and fatigue in adults with evidence of Epstein-Barr virus infection. January 1985 pmid2578268 EBV CFS
  Post-viral fatigue syndrome: evidence for underlying organic disturbance in the muscle fibre. November 7, 1989 pmid2792146 CFS
  Immunologic abnormalities in chronic fatigue syndrome. June 1990 pmid2166084 CFS
  Postinfectious chronic fatigue syndrome: case history of thirty-five patients in Germany. May 1991 pmid1893076 EBV HHV-6 CFS
  Epstein-Barr virus infection in Desert Storm reservists. August 1994 pmid7824153 GWI EBV CFS
  Antibody responses to Epstein-Barr virus, human herpesvirus 6 and human herpesvirus 7 in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. January 1995 pmid8724857 EBV HHV-6 HHV-7 CFS
  MMPI profiles of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. January 1996 pmid8730646 EBV CFS
  possible correlation between Borna disease virus infection and Japanese patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. December 1996 pmid8839433 CFS
  Detection of Mycoplasma genus and Mycoplasma fermentans by PCR in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. December 1998 pmid9879928 mycoplasma CFS
  Multiple mycoplasmal infections detected in blood of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and/or fibromyalgia syndrome. December 1999 pmid10691196 Fibromyalgia mycoplasma CFS
  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) in 15 dogs and cats with specific biochemical and microbiological anomalies. July 2001 pmid11440190 -k9 Staph CFS
  High prevalence of Mycoplasma infections among European chronic fatigue syndrome patients. Examination of four Mycoplasma species in blood of chronic fatigue syndrome patients. Nov 15, 2002 pmid12423773 mycoplasma CFS
  Multiple co-infections (Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, human herpes virus-6) in blood of chronic fatigue syndrome patients: association with signs and symptoms. May 2003 pmid12887507 C. pneumoniae HHV-6 mycoplasma CFS
  Fatigue in medical residents leads to reactivation of herpes virus latency. Dec 20, 2011 pmid22229027 EBV
  Response to valganciclovir in chronic fatigue syndrome patients with human herpesvirus 6 and Epstein-Barr virus IgG antibody titers. December 2012 pmid23080504 EBV HHV-6 CFS
 
  O PMID: 2578268
74% of patients with chronic illness and fatigue had an active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

Persisting illness and fatigue in adults with evidence of Epstein-Barr virus infection.

Clinical, serologic, virologic, and immunologic evaluations for 31 adults with chronic illness and fatigue suggested that 23 had persisting Epstein-Barr virus infection. …
Epstein-Barr virus may be associated with chronic illness in adults.
http://www.researchfraud.com/cfs-opportunistic-infections/#pmid2578268
EBV CFS
From:
http://pubmedhh.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi?id=2578268
Title: Persisting illness and fatigue in adults with evidence of Epstein-Barr virus infection.
Author: Straus SE, Tosato G, Armstrong G, Lawley T, Preble OT, Henle W, Davey R, Pearson G, Epstein J, Brus I.
Journal: Ann Intern Med; 1985 Jan; 102(1):7-16. PubMed ID: 2578268.
Abstract:
Clinical, serologic , virologic, and immunologic evaluations for 31 adults with chronic illness and fatigue suggested that 23 had persisting Epstein-Barr virus infection. Among these 23 patients, cellular immune mechanisms were generally normal, but 4 had mild immunoglobulin deficiencies. However, 20 patients had abnormal serologic profiles specific for Epstein-Barr virus shown by significantly elevated titers of antibodies to the viral capsid antigen or early antigen, or by a deficiency of late-appearing antibodies. In 11 of 15 patients tested, circulating immune complexes were found. Circulating interferon was not found in 18 patients tested, but the activity of 2-5 oligoadenylate synthetase, an interferon-induced enzyme, was increased in 5 patients studied. Of 19 patients, 18 had persisting suppressor T-cell activity typically found in patients recovering from acute infectious mononucleosis. We believe that the Epstein-Barr virus may be associated with chronic illness in adults.
Mobile Desktop Retrieved on: 04/15/2015
 
  O PMID: 2792146
Evidence of a persistent viral infection and damage in the muscle fibers.

Post-viral fatigue syndrome: evidence for underlying organic disturbance in the muscle fibre.

A muscle membrane disorder probably arising from defective myogenic enzymes is the likely mechanism for the fatigue and the single-fibre EMG abnormalities. This muscle membrane defect may be due to the effects of a persistent viral infection.
http://www.researchfraud.com/cfs-opportunistic-infections/#pmid2792146
CFS
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http://pubmedhh.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi?id=2792146
Title: Post-viral fatigue syndrome: evidence for underlying organic disturbance in the muscle fibre.
Author: Jamal GA, Hansen S.
Journal: Eur Neurol; 1989; 29(5):273-6. PubMed ID: 2792146.
Abstract:
Ten patients with post-viral fatigue syndrome and abnormal serological, virological, immunological and histological studies were examined by the single-fibre electromyographic (EMG) technique after excluding concurrent problems in the neuromuscular system. No abnormality of fibre density was noted but all patients had abnormal jitter values. Very high jitter values were not associated with impulse or concomitant blocking. The findings confirm the organic nature of the disease. A muscle membrane disorder probably arising from defective myogenic enzymes is the likely mechanism for the fatigue and the single-fibre EMG abnormalities. This muscle membrane defect may be due to the effects of a persistent viral infection.
Mobile Desktop Retrieved on: 04/27/2015
 
  O PMID: 2166084
Immune system markers were abnormal in CFS patients. The pattern matches that of patients with a chronic viral infection.

Immunologic abnormalities in chronic fatigue syndrome.

There was, however, a significant decrease in the suppressor inducer subset of CD4+ CD45RA+ cells. ... The patterns of immune marker abnormalities observed was compatible with a chronic viral reactivation syndrome.
http://www.researchfraud.com/cfs-opportunistic-infections/#pmid2166084
CFS
Downloaded From:
http://pubmedhh.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi?id=2166084
Title: Immunologic abnormalities in chronic fatigue syndrome.
Author: Klimas NG, Salvato FR, Morgan R, Fletcher MA.
Journal: J Clin Microbiol; 1990 Jun; 28(6):1403-10. PubMed ID: 2166084.
Abstract:
The chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), formerly known as chronic Epstein-Barr virus syndrome, is a clinical state of some complexity and uncertain etiology. In order to characterize in a comprehensive manner the status of laboratory markers associated with cellular immune function in patients with this syndrome, 30 patients with clinically defined CFS were studied. All of the subjects were found to have multiple abnormalities in these markers. The most consistent immunological abnormality detected among these patients, when compared with normal controls, was low natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity. The number of NK cells, as defined by reactivity with monoclonal antibody NKH.1 (CD56), was elevated, but the killing of K562 tumor cells per CD56 cell was significantly diminished. Lymphoproliferative responses after stimulation with phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen were decreased in most patients when compared with those in normal controls, as was the production of gamma interferon following mitogen stimulation. Lymphocyte phenotypic marker analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes showed that there were significant differences between patients with CFS and controls. There was an increase in the percentage of suppressor-cytotoxic T lymphocytes, CD8, and a proportionally larger increase in the number of CD8 cells expressing the class II activation marker. Most patients had an elevated number of CD2 cells which expressed the activation marker CDw26. The numbers of CD4 cells and the helper subset of CD4+CD29+ cells in patients with CFS were not different from those in controls. There was, however, a significant decrease in the suppressor inducer subset of CD4+ CD45RA+ cells. The number of B cells, CD20 and CD21, were elevated, as were the numbers of a subset of B cells which coexpressed CD20 and CD5. The patterns of immune marker abnormalities observed was compatible with a chronic viral reactivation syndrome.
Mobile Desktop Retrieved on: 09/03/2015
 
  O PMID: 1893076

73% of chronic fatigue syndrome patients in Germany had an active human herpesvirus-6 infection.

34.4% of patients had an active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

Postinfectious chronic fatigue syndrome: case history of thirty-five patients in Germany.

Thirty-five patients with chronic fatigue syndrome according to the criteria of Holmes were followed for periods of up to eight years. The most frequent symptoms were severe fatigue, arthralgias and myalgias, recurrent oropharyngitis and various psychiatric disorders. More than half of the patients suffered from neuropathy, lymphadenopathy, gastrointestinal complaints and recurrent low-grade fever. Recurrent or persistent activity of human herpesvirus -6 infection was seen in 73% of the patients and of Epstein-Barr virus in 34.4%.
http://www.researchfraud.com/cfs-opportunistic-infections/#pmid1893076
EBV HHV-6 CFS
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http://pubmedhh.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi?id=1893076
Title: Postinfectious chronic fatigue syndrome: case history of thirty-five patients in Germany.
Author: Hilgers A, Krueger GR, Lembke U, Ramon A.
Journal: In Vivo; ; 5(3):201-5. PubMed ID: 1893076.
Abstract:
Thirty-five patients with chronic fatigue syndrome according to the criteria of Holmes were followed for periods of up to eight years. The most frequent symptoms were severe fatigue, arthralgias and myalgias, recurrent oropharyngitis and various psychiatric disorders. More than half of the patients suffered from neuropathy, lymphadenopathy, gastrointestinal complaints and recurrent low-grade fever. Recurrent or persistent activity of human herpesvirus -6 infection was seen in 73% of the patients and of Epstein-Barr virus in 34.4%. In addition, various other infections were diagnosed at lower frequency. Initial routine immunologic screening revealed various types of deficiencies, these were yet inconsistent and variable when different patients were compared with each other. Tentative treatments included in immunoglobulins, nonspecific immunostimulation and virostatic drugs. No consistently positive results were obtained with any treatment schedule although immunoglobulins appeared the most efficient measure. In addition, psychologic care of the patients is indicated, since disturbances in the psycho-neuroimmunologic regulation may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of the disease.
Mobile Desktop Retrieved on: 04/30/2015
 
  O PMID: 7824153
73% of these selected service members were positive either for an acute or reactivated Epstein-Barr viral infection.

Epstein-Barr virus infection in Desert Storm reservists.

Approximately 150 U.S. Army reservists from Indiana reported symptoms consistent with chronic fatigue syndrome after returning stateside from the tour of duty in Saudi Arabia. …
Seventy-three percent of these selected service members were positive either for an acute or reactivated Epstein-Barr viral infection.
http://www.researchfraud.com/cfs-opportunistic-infections/#pmid7824153
EBV GWI CFS
Downloaded From:
http://pubmedhh.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi?id=7824153
Title: Epstein-Barr virus infection in Desert Storm reservists.
Author: Carver LA, Connallon PF, Flanigan SJ, Crossley-Miller MK.
Journal: Mil Med; 1994 Aug; 159(8):580-2. PubMed ID: 7824153.
Abstract:
Approximately 150 U.S. Army reservists from Indiana reported symptoms consistent with chronic fatigue syndrome after returning stateside from the tour of duty in Saudi Arabia. A psychiatric team confirmed the diagnosis, evaluated possible etiology, and treated the service members when appropriate. Those available service members who met the study's diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome (n = 37) received an Epstein-Barr virus panel. Seventy-three percent of these selected service members were positive either for an acute or reactivated Epstein-Barr viral infection. These data suggest that service members who suffer from chronic fatigue syndrome may have their symptoms increased and prolonged by secondary viral infections.
Mobile Desktop Retrieved on: 05/01/2015
 
  O PMID: 8724857
Patients with CFS may have reactivations of EBV, HHV-6 and HHV-7

Antibody responses to Epstein-Barr virus, human herpesvirus 6 and human herpesvirus 7 in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

These results are consistent with the view that CFS patients may have reactivations of EBV, HHV-6 and HHV-7.
http://www.researchfraud.com/cfs-opportunistic-infections/#pmid8724857
HHV-6 HHV-7 EBV CFS
Downloaded From:
http://pubmedhh.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi?id=8724857
Title: Antibody responses to Epstein-Barr virus, human herpesvirus 6 and human herpesvirus 7 in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.
Author: Sairenji T, Yamanishi K, Tachibana Y, Bertoni G, Kurata T.
Journal: Intervirology; 1995; 38(5):269-73. PubMed ID: 8724857.
Abstract:
To test for an association between chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and infections with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7), antibodies to these viruses were tested in the serum from three groups of individuals: (1) 10 CFS patients with chronic fatigue beginning with a clinical pattern of acute infectious mononucleosis [IM; true chronic IM (CIM)]; (2) 10 CFS patients whose illness did not start with acute IM (non-CIM), and (3) healthy controls. High EBV antibody titers were demonstrated in most patients. Antibodies to ZEBRA, a product of the immediate early EBV gene BZLF1, were detected in the serum of CFS patients at a higher frequency than in healthy controls. Antibody titers to HHV-6 and HHV-7 were also higher in the patients with CFS than in the controls. These results are consistent with the view that CFS patients may have reactivations of EBV, HHV-6 and HHV-7.
Mobile Desktop Retrieved on: 05/01/2015
 
  O PMID: 8730646
EBV antibodies were elevated in CFS patients and was associated with worse symptoms.

MMPI profiles of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

EBV titers were higher among CFS patients and were associated with being more symptomatic.
http://www.researchfraud.com/cfs-opportunistic-infections/#pmid8730646
EBV CFS
Downloaded From:
http://pubmedhh.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi?id=8730646
Title: MMPI profiles of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.
Author: Schmaling KB, Jones JF.
Journal: J Psychosom Res; 1996 Jan; 40(1):67-74. PubMed ID: 8730646.
Abstract:
Fifty-three patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and 43 healthy nonpatient controls completed the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). All subjects varied in their degree of seropositivity to active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) as measured by their anti-early antigen titers. EBV titers were higher among CFS patients and were associated with being more symptomatic. Differences in patient status were associated with statistically significant elevations on 8 of 9 clinical scales, 4 of which also showed clinically significant elevations (T scores > or = 70): scales 1, 2, 3, and 8. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for intervention strategies associated with MMPI-based CFS subtypes.
Mobile Desktop Retrieved on: 05/02/2015
 
  O PMID: 8839433

Possible correlation between Borna disease virus infection and Japanese patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic, as yet unclassified, non-segmented, negative-sense, single-strand RNA virus. Natural infection with this virus has been reported to occur in horses and sheep. In addition, antibodies to BDV in plasma or BDV RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were also found in patients with neuropsychiatric diseases. We describe here the possible link between the patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and infection with BDV.
http://www.researchfraud.com/cfs-opportunistic-infections/#pmid8839433
CFS
Downloaded From:
http://pubmedhh.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi?id=8839433
Title: Possible correlation between Borna disease virus infection and Japanese patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.
Author: Kitani T, Kuratsune H, Fuke I, Nakamura Y, Nakaya T, Asahi S, Tobiume M, Yamaguti K, Machii T, Inagi R, Yamanishi K, Ikuta K.
Journal: Microbiol Immunol; 1996; 40(6):459-62. PubMed ID: 8839433.
Abstract:
Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic, as yet unclassified, non-segmented, negative-sense, single-strand RNA virus. Natural infection with this virus has been reported to occur in horses and sheep. In addition, antibodies to BDV in plasma or BDV RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were also found in patients with neuropsychiatric diseases. We describe here the possible link between the patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and infection with BDV.
Mobile Desktop Retrieved on: 05/07/2015
 
  O PMID: 9879928
52% of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patients had a detectable mycoplasma infection.

Detection of Mycoplasma genus and Mycoplasma fermentans by PCR in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

Blood was collected from 100 patients with CFS and 50 control subjects. The amplified products of 717 bp of Mycoplasma genus, and 206 bp of M. fermentans were detected in DNA purified from blood samples in 52% and 34% of CFS samples, respectively
http://www.researchfraud.com/cfs-opportunistic-infections/#pmid9879928
mycoplasma CFS
Downloaded From:
http://pubmedhh.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi?id=9879928
Title: Detection of Mycoplasma genus and Mycoplasma fermentans by PCR in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.
Author: Vojdani A, Choppa PC, Tagle C, Andrin R, Samimi B, Lapp CW.
Journal: FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol; 1998 Dec; 22(4):355-65. PubMed ID: 9879928.
Abstract:
Mycoplasma fermentans and other Mycoplasma species are colonizers of human mucosal surfaces and may be associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection. While many infectious agents have been described in different percentages of patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), little is known about the prevalence of mycoplasmas and especially M. fermentans in CFS patients. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay was used to detect Mycoplasma genus and M. fermentans genomes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of CFS patients. Blood was collected from 100 patients with CFS and 50 control subjects. The amplified products of 717 bp of Mycoplasma genus, and 206 bp of M. fermentans were detected in DNA purified from blood samples in 52% and 34% of CFS samples, respectively. In contrast, these genomes were found in only 14% and 8% of healthy control subjects respectively (P < 0.0001). All samples were confirmed by Southern blot with a specific probe based on internal sequences of the expected amplification product. Several samples, which were positive for Mycoplasma genus, were negative for M. fermentans indicating that other Mycoplasma species are involved. A quantitative PCR was developed to determine the number of M. fermentans genome copies present in 1 microg of DNA for controls and CFS patients. Mycoplasma copy numbers ranging from 130 to 880 and from 264 to 2400 were detected in controls and CFS positive subjects, respectively. An enzyme immunoassay was applied for the detection of antibodies against p29 surface lipoprotein of M. fermentans to determine the relationship between M. fermentans genome copy numbers and antibody levels. Individuals with high genome copy numbers exhibited higher IgG and IgM antibodies against M. fermentans specific peptides. Isolation of this organism by culture from clinical specimens is needed in order to demonstrate specificity of signal detected by PCR in this study.
Mobile Desktop Retrieved on: 03/08/2016
 
  O PMID: 10691196
All 91 CFS and/or Fibromyalgia patients were known to have at least one mycoplasma infection. This study was done to see how many of them had two or more mycoplasma infections.

30.8% had double infections.            22% had triple infections.

Multiple mycoplasmal infections detected in blood of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and/or fibromyalgia syndrome.

In this study, patients with chronic fatigue syndrome/fibromyalgia syndrome were examined for multiple mycoplasmal infections in their blood. A total of 91 patients diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome/fibromyalgia syndrome and with a positive test for any mycoplasmal infection were investigated for the presence of Mycoplasma fermentans, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma penetrans in blood using forensic polymerase chain reaction. Among these mycoplasma-positive patients, infections were detected with Mycoplasma pneumoniae (54/91), Mycoplasma fermentans (44/91), Mycoplasma hominis (28/91) and Mycoplasma penetrans (18/91). Multiple mycoplasmal infections were found in 48 of 91 patients, with double infections being detected in 30.8% and triple infections in 22%, but only when one of the species was Mycoplasma pneumoniae or Mycoplasma fermentans. Patients infected with more than one mycoplasmal species generally had a longer history of illness, suggesting that they may have contracted additional mycoplasmal infections with time.
http://www.researchfraud.com/cfs-opportunistic-infections/#pmid10691196
mycoplasma Fibromyalgia CFS
Downloaded From:
http://pubmedhh.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi?id=10691196
Title: Multiple mycoplasmal infections detected in blood of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and/or fibromyalgia syndrome.
Author: Nasralla M, Haier J, Nicolson GL.
Journal: Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis; 1999 Dec; 18(12):859-65. PubMed ID: 10691196.
Abstract:
The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of different mycoplasmal species in blood samples from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and/or fibromyalgia syndrome. Previously, more than 60% of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome/fibromyalgia syndrome were found to have mycoplasmal blood infections, such as Mycoplasma fermentans infection. In this study, patients with chronic fatigue syndrome/fibromyalgia syndrome were examined for multiple mycoplasmal infections in their blood. A total of 91 patients diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome/fibromyalgia syndrome and with a positive test for any mycoplasmal infection were investigated for the presence of Mycoplasma fermentans, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma penetrans in blood using forensic polymerase chain reaction. Among these mycoplasma-positive patients, infections were detected with Mycoplasma pneumoniae (54/91), Mycoplasma fermentans (44/91), Mycoplasma hominis (28/91) and Mycoplasma penetrans (18/91). Multiple mycoplasmal infections were found in 48 of 91 patients, with double infections being detected in 30.8% and triple infections in 22%, but only when one of the species was Mycoplasma pneumoniae or Mycoplasma fermentans. Patients infected with more than one mycoplasmal species generally had a longer history of illness, suggesting that they may have contracted additional mycoplasmal infections with time.
Mobile Desktop Retrieved on: 03/01/2016
 
  O PMID: 11440190
Canines and felines with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) in 15 dogs and cats with specific biochemical and microbiological anomalies.

A great deal of controversy and speculation surrounds the etiology of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) in human patients and the existence of a similar illness in animals. To evaluate the association with a presumptive staphylococcal infection and bacteremia, seven dogs and eight cats diagnosed with CFS (two meeting the CDC working case definition) were submitted to rapid blood cultures and fresh blood smears investigations. Nine out of 15 blood cultures proved Staph-positive and four isolates were specified as S. xilosus (3) and S. intermedius (1). The presence of micrococci-like organisms in the blood was of common observation among these subjects, in association with fatigue/pain-related symptoms and biochemical abnormalities suggestive of a myopathy. Following treatment with a low dosage arsenical drug (thiacetarsamide sodium, Caparsolate, i.v., 0.1 ml/kg/day) all patients experienced complete remission. Micrococci disappeared from the blood at post-treatment controls made 10-30 days later. The outcomes were compared with those of five healthy controls and five 'sick with other illness' patients showing significant difference.
http://www.researchfraud.com/cfs-opportunistic-infections/#pmid11440190
Staph CFS
Downloaded From:
http://pubmedhh.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi?id=11440190
Title: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) in 15 dogs and cats with specific biochemical and microbiological anomalies. Author: Tarello W.
Journal: Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis; 2001 Jul; 24(3):165-85. PubMed ID: 11440190.
Abstract:
A great deal of controversy and speculation surrounds the etiology of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) in human patients and the existence of a similar illness in animals. To evaluate the association with a presumptive staphylococcal infection and bacteremia, seven dogs and eight cats diagnosed with CFS (two meeting the CDC working case definition) were submitted to rapid blood cultures and fresh blood smears investigations. Nine out of 15 blood cultures proved Staph-positive and four isolates were specified as S. xilosus (3) and S. intermedius (1). The presence of micrococci-like organisms in the blood was of common observation among these subjects, in association with fatigue/pain-related symptoms and biochemical abnormalities suggestive of a myopathy. Following treatment with a low dosage arsenical drug (thiacetarsamide sodium, Caparsolate, i.v., 0.1 ml/kg/day) all patients experienced complete remission. Micrococci disappeared from the blood at post-treatment controls made 10-30 days later. The outcomes were compared with those of five healthy controls and five 'sick with other illness' patients showing significant difference.
Mobile Desktop Retrieved on: 05/10/2015
 
  O PMID: 12423773
68% of CFS patients had a detectable mycoplasma infection. Only 5.6% of healthy controls did.

High prevalence of Mycoplasma infections among European chronic fatigue syndrome patients. Examination of four Mycoplasma species in blood of chronic fatigue syndrome patients.

…the presence of Mycoplasma fermentans, M. penetrans, M. pneumoniae and M. hominis in the blood of 261 European CFS patients and 36 healthy volunteers was examined using forensic polymerase chain reaction. One hundred and seventy-nine (68.6%) patients were infected by at least one species of Mycoplasma, compared to two out of 36 (5.6%) in the control sample (P<0.001).
http://www.researchfraud.com/cfs-opportunistic-infections/#pmid12423773
mycoplasma CFS
Downloaded From:
http://pubmedhh.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi?id=12423773
Title: High prevalence of Mycoplasma infections among European chronic fatigue syndrome patients. Examination of four Mycoplasma species in blood of chronic fatigue syndrome patients.
Author: Nijs J, Nicolson GL, De Becker P, Coomans D, De Meirleir K.
Journal: FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol; 2002 Nov 15; 34(3):209-14. PubMed ID: 12423773.
Abstract:
Prevalence of Mycoplasma species infections in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) has been extensively reported in the scientific literature. However, all previous reports highlighted the presence of Mycoplasmas in American patients. In this prospective study, the presence of Mycoplasma fermentans, M. penetrans, M. pneumoniae and M. hominis in the blood of 261 European CFS patients and 36 healthy volunteers was examined using forensic polymerase chain reaction. One hundred and seventy-nine (68.6%) patients were infected by at least one species of Mycoplasma, compared to two out of 36 (5.6%) in the control sample (P < 0.001). Among Mycoplasma-infected patients, M. hominis was the most frequently observed infection (n=96; 36.8% of the overall sample), followed by M. pneumoniae and M. fermentans infections (equal frequencies; n=67; 25.7%). M. penetrans infections were not found. Multiple mycoplasmal infections were detected in 45 patients (17.2%). Compared to American CFS patients (M. pneumoniae > M. hominis > M. penetrans), a slightly different pattern of mycoplasmal infections was found in European CFS patients (M. hominis > M. pneumoniae, M. fermentansz. ≫ M. penetrans).
Mobile Desktop Retrieved on: 05/11/2015
 
  O PMID: 12887507
52% of CFS patients had mycoplasmal infections. This matches an earlier study.
30.5% had an active human herpes virus-6 infection.

Multiple co-infections (Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, human herpes virus-6) in blood of chronic fatigue syndrome patients: association with signs and symptoms.

The results indicate that a large subset of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patients show evidence of bacterial and/or viral infection(s), and these infections may contribute to the severity of signs and symptoms found in these patients.
http://www.researchfraud.com/cfs-opportunistic-infections/#pmid12887507
C. pneumoniae HHV-6 mycoplasma CFS
Downloaded From:
http://pubmedhh.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi?id=12887507

Title: Multiple co-infections (Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, human herpes virus-6) in blood of chronic fatigue syndrome patients: association with signs and symptoms.
Author: Nicolson GL, Gan R, Haier J.
Journal: APMIS; 2003 May; 111(5):557-66. PubMed ID: 12887507.
Abstract:
Previously we and others found that a majority of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) patients showed evidence of systemic mycoplasmal infections, and their blood tested positive using a polymerase chain reaction assay for at least one of the four following Mycoplasma species: M. fermentans, M. hominis, M. pneumoniae or M. penetrans. Consistent with previous results, patients in the current study (n=200) showed a high prevalence (overall 52%) of mycoplasmal infections. Using forensic polymerase chain reaction we also examined whether these same patients showed evidence of infections with Chlamydia pneumoniae (overall 7.5% positive) and/or active human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6, overall 30.5% positive). Since the presence of one or more infections may predispose patients to other infections, we examined the prevalence of C. pneumoniae and HHV-6 active infections in mycoplasma-positive and -negative patients. Unexpectedly, we found that the incidence of C. pneumoniae or HHV-6 was similar in Mycoplasma-positive and -negative patients, and the converse was also found in active HHV-6-positive and -negative patients. Control subjects (n=100) had low rates of mycoplasmal (6%), active HHV-6 (9%) or chlamydial (1%) infections, and there were no co-infections in control subjects. Differences in bacterial and/or viral infections in CFS patients compared to control subjects were significant. Severity and incidence of patients' signs and symptoms were compared within the above groups. Although there was a tendency for patients with multiple infections to have more severe signs and symptoms (p<0.01), the only significant differences found were in the incidence and severity of certain signs and symptoms in patients with multiple co-infections of any type compared to the other groups (p<0.01). There was no correlation between the type of co-infection and severity of signs and symptoms. The results indicate that a large subset of CFS patients show evidence of bacterial and/or viral infection(s), and these infections may contribute to the severity of signs and symptoms found in these patients.

Mobile Desktop Retrieved on: 05/11/2015
 
  O PMID: 22229027
Fatigue in medical students can lead to immune suppression and reactivate latent Epstein-Barr viral infections.

Fatigue in medical residents leads to reactivation of herpes virus latency.

EBV DNA level increased significantly at both stress intervals, while VZV DNA level increased only at low-stress. DNA levels of HSV-1 decreased at low-stress but increased at high-stress. Combined assessment of the viral DNA showed significant effect of stress on herpes virus reactivation at both stress intervals.
http://www.researchfraud.com/cfs-opportunistic-infections/#pmid22229027
EBV
Previously downloaded from:
http://pubmedhh.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi?id=22229027
Title: Fatigue in medical residents leads to reactivation of herpes virus latency.
Author: Uchakin PN, Parish DC, Dane FC, Uchakina ON, Scheetz AP, Agarwal NK, Smith BE.
Journal: Interdiscip Perspect Infect Dis; 2011; 2011():571340. PubMed ID: 22229027.
Abstract:
The main objective of this study was to detect fatigue-induced clinical symptoms of immune suppression in medical residents. Samples were collected from the subjects at rest, following the first night (low-stress), and the last night (high-stress) of night float. Computerized reaction tests, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Wellness Profile questionnaires were used to quantify fatigue level. DNA of human herpes viruses HSV-1, VZV, EBV, as well as cortisol and melatonin concentrations, were measured in saliva. Residents at the high-stress interval reported being sleepier compared to the rest interval. EBV DNA level increased significantly at both stress intervals, while VZV DNA level increased only at low-stress. DNA levels of HSV-1 decreased at low-stress but increased at high-stress. Combined assessment of the viral DNA showed significant effect of stress on herpes virus reactivation at both stress intervals. Cortisol concentrations at both stress intervals were significantly higher than those at rest.
Mobile Desktop Retrieved on: June 28, 2015
 
  O PMID: 23080504
An antiviral drug improves the symptoms of CFS.

Response to valganciclovir in chronic fatigue syndrome patients with human herpesvirus 6 and Epstein-Barr virus IgG antibody titers.

... Longer valganciclovir treatment correlated with an improved response.
http://www.researchfraud.com/cfs-opportunistic-infections/#pmid23080504
HHV-6 EBV CFS
Previously downloaded from:
http://pubmedhh.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi?id=23080504
Title: Response to valganciclovir in chronic fatigue syndrome patients with human herpesvirus 6 and Epstein-Barr virus IgG antibody titers.
Author: Watt T, Oberfoell S, Balise R, Lunn MR, Kar AK, Merrihew L, Bhangoo MS, Montoya JG.
Journal: J Med Virol; 2012 Dec; 84(12):1967-74. PubMed ID: 23080504.
Abstract:
Valganciclovir has been reported to improve physical and cognitive symptoms in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) with elevated human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) IgG antibody titers. This study investigated whether antibody titers against HHV-6 and EBV were associated with clinical response to valganciclovir in a subset of CFS patients. An uncontrolled, unblinded retrospective chart review was performed on 61 CFS patients treated with 900 mg valganciclovir daily (55 of whom took an induction dose of 1,800 mg daily for the first 3 weeks). Antibody titers were considered high if HHV-6 IgG ≥ 1:320, EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) IgG ≥ 1:640, and EBV early antigen (EA) IgG ≥ 1:160. Patients self-rated physical and cognitive functioning as a percentage of their functioning prior to illness. Patients were categorized as responders if they experienced at least 30% improvement in physical and/or cognitive functioning. Thirty-two patients (52%) were categorized as responders. Among these, 19 patients (59%) responded physically and 26 patients (81%) responded cognitively. Baseline antibody titers showed no significant association with response. After treatment, the average change in physical and cognitive functioning levels for all patients was +19% and +23%, respectively (P < 0.0001). Longer treatment was associated with improved response (P = 0.0002). No significant difference was found between responders and non-responders among other variables analyzed. Valganciclovir treatment, independent of the baseline antibody titers, was associated with self-rated improvement in physical and cognitive functioning for CFS patients who had positive HHV-6 and/or EBV serologies. Longer valganciclovir treatment correlated with an improved response.
Mobile Desktop Retrieved on: June 28, 2015
 
O

Conclusion


These diagnoses exist for so-called "post" infectious syndromes


  • post ebola syndrome
  • post hepatitis syndrome
  • post-infectious fatigue syndrome
  • post-infectious glomerulonephritis with nephrotic syndrome
  • post-infectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  • post-malaria neurological syndrome
  • post polio syndrome
  • post Q-fever fatigue syndrome
  • post sepsis syndrome
  • post-streptococcal uveitis syndrome
  • post treatment lyme disease syndrome
  • post viral fatigue syndrome


All these add up to millions of people.

    There is a vast amount of good research supporting the existence of immune suppression with active opportunistic infections. This evidence is ignored by those with authority in the medical system. CFS patients are very disabled and can barely function. Rather than helping CFS patients, the current medical system is actually putting effort into denying them proper healthcare with ongoing efforts to perpetuate a psychiatric definition of this disease. Their psychiatric interpretations are not evidence-based. They are scientifically invalid statements which contradict the valid scientific evidence.


ResearchFraud.com Action Points... ResearchFraud.com

"The root cause of CFS is continuing active opportunistic infections with immune suppression."
O

Definitions

  1. arthralgia
    ar·thral·gi·a (ahr-thral'jē-ă)
    Pain in a joint, especially noninflammatory.
    arthralgia. (n.d.) Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing. (2012). Retrieved June 1 2016 from http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/arthralgia
    pain in a joint, especially if the absence of inflammation makes the term arthritis inappropriate.
    intermittent or periodic arthralgia joint pain at intervals, usually accompanied by swelling (e.g. of the knee).
    arthralgia. (n.d.) Dictionary of Sport and Exercise Science and Medicine by Churchill Livingstone. (2008). Retrieved June 1 2016 from http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/arthralgia
  2. biomarker
    /bio·mark·er/ (bi´o-mahr″ker)
    a biological molecule used as a marker for a substance or process of interest.
    biomarker. (n.d.) Dorland's Medical Dictionary for Health Consumers. (2007). Retrieved June 22 2016 from http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/biomarker
  3. EBV   Epstein-Barr virus
    A virus in the herpes family that causes mononucleosis.
    Mentioned in: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    EBV. (n.d.) Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. (2008). Retrieved June 22 2016 from http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/EBV
  4. And others.

     

    [L. et alii]
    et al. (n.d.) Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing. (2012). Retrieved May 24 2016 from http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/et+al
  5. lymphadenopathy
    [limfad′inop′əthē]
    any disorder characterized by a localized or generalized enlargement of the lymph nodes or lymph vessels.
    lymphadenopathy. (n.d.) Mosby's Medical Dictionary, 8th edition. (2009). Retrieved June 22 2016 from http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/lymphadenopathy
  6. Muscular pain or tenderness, typically of a diffuse and/or nonspecific nature.
    Mentioned in: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Ross River Virus
    myalgia. (n.d.) Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. (2008). Retrieved May 22 2016 from http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/myalgia
  7. myogenic
    (mī'ō-jě-net'ik, -jen'ik)
    1. Originating in or starting from muscle.
    2. Relating to the origin of muscle cells or fibers.
    myogenic. (n.d.) Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing. (2012). Retrieved June 22 2016 from http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/myogenic
  8. A condition affecting the nerves supplying the arms and legs. Typically, the feet and hands are involved first. If sensory nerves are involved, numbness, tingling, and pain are prominent, and if motor nerves are involved, the patient experiences weakness.
    neuropathy. (n.d.) Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. (2008). Retrieved June 22 2016 from http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/neuropathy
  9. Being attracted to, or having an affinity for, nerve tissue. Various toxic substances and some viruses are neurotropic.
    neurotropic. (n.d.) Collins Dictionary of Medicine. (2004, 2005). Retrieved June 22 2016 from http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/neurotropic
  10. serologic
    (sē'rō-loj'ik)
    Etymology: L, serum, whey; Gk, logos,
    science pertaining to the branch of medicine concerned with the study of blood sera.
    serologic. (n.d.) Mosby's Medical Dictionary, 8th edition. (2009). Retrieved June 22 2016 from http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/serologic
  11. titer
    /ti·ter/ (ti´ter)
    the quantity of a substance required to react with or to correspond to a given amount of another substance.
    titer. (n.d.) Dorland's Medical Dictionary for Health Consumers. (2007). Retrieved June 22 2016 from http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/titer
  12. virology
    /vi·rol·o·gy/ (vi-rol´ah-je)
    the study of viruses and virus diseases.
    virology. (n.d.) Dorland's Medical Dictionary for Health Consumers. (2007). Retrieved June 22 2016 from http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/virology

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    pmid: 8730646
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  9. Vojdani A, Choppa PC, Tagle C, Andrin R, Samimi B, Lapp CW. Detection of Mycoplasma genus and Mycoplasma fermentans by PCR in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 1998;22(4):355-65.
    pmid: 9879928
  10. Nasralla M, Haier J, Nicolson GL. Multiple mycoplasmal infections detected in blood of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and/or fibromyalgia syndrome. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1999;18(12):859-65.
    pmid: 10691196
  11. Tarello W. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) in 15 dogs and cats with specific biochemical and microbiological anomalies. Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis. 2001;24(3):165-85.
  12. Nijs J, Nicolson GL, De becker P, Coomans D, De meirleir K. High prevalence of Mycoplasma infections among European chronic fatigue syndrome patients.
    Examination of four Mycoplasma species in blood of chronic fatigue syndrome patients. FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 2002;34(3):209-14.
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  14. Uchakin PN, Parish DC, Dane FC, et al. Fatigue in medical residents leads to reactivation of herpes virus latency. Interdiscip Perspect Infect Dis. 2011;2011:571340.
  15. Watt T, Oberfoell S, Balise R, et al. Response to valganciclovir in chronic fatigue syndrome patients with human herpesvirus 6 and Epstein-Barr virus IgG antibody titers. J Med Virol. 2012;84(12):1967-74.
  1. Click here to go to the
    study on this page.
  2. The study relies on invalid psychiatric conclusions.
    ( Lacks scientific validity. )
Last modified: 6/20/2016 6:06pm